Comforted by God

If you’re reading this, I’m assuming a couple of things about you. First, you are a human, and thus have feelings and emotions. Second, because of these feelings and emotions, you have been hurt at some point in your life, some of you deeply hurt by those who should have taken care of you. The third thing I assume about you is that you did not enjoy the process of being hurt. This part isn’t complicated. People hurt other people and the consequences are not fun. This is the result of sin in the world, and as long as there is still sin, there will be pain.

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Trinitarian fellowship

Q. What is the meaning and significance of our confession of the “homoousia” and “perichoresis” of Father Son and Spirit? How does this speak to the unity or simplicity of God?
A. By this we confess that each member of the Trinity, while distinct in subsistence (or self-awareness), is of the same substance (meaning that they are each fully, truly and eternally God) and that each mutually indwells the others so as to eternally coexist as one, unified God (Jn. 10:38, Rom. 8:9-11). By this we affirm that God is one God (Deut. 6:4), and that he is indeed three persons who mutually glorify one another and participate in all of his works (albeit with different emphases and focuses), thereby drawing believers to participate in the life of the Trinity. (Originally published in a Catechism I turned in to Dr. Clark at the Moody Bible Institute for Systematic Theology I) 

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Pointing toward Christ

I just returned from a weekend retreat with the youth group I work with. If you’ve ever gone to a youth retreat, you know that they’re usually loud, energetic and fun, but all too frequently, the theology presented is weak and shallow. This was fortunately not the case this weekend (not too badly, anyway).

It made me think about the purpose of such retreats though. Why do we take the time to bring young people a couple hundred miles from home, keep them up late, hype them up and even spend money on it? Continue reading

The Art of Lament

Note: I published a version of this post a year ago. Writing and publishing it then was really helpful for me as I worked through some major grief. Since I published it though, I have experienced the loss of my grandfather and a number of other smaller, but still difficult things, all of which caused me grief and sorrow. God has worked in me tremendously, and I believe will be helpful to publish this reworked version of last year’s post.

Something that has been weighing heavily on my mind for the last year is the idea of Christian lament. How should Christians go about the grieving, mourning or lamenting process? Beyond this, how must we handle depression or times of intense sadness? I believe these are issues the church has failed to address for a long time, and ones that we must speak out on. My reasons for believing this are varied, but essentially they come down to a question of the function of the Church. If we believe (as the bible teaches) that the Church is to be a place where we can both reach a lost world for Christ and also build up Christians in their knowledge of God, helping them mature, we must be prepared to speak out on real-world issues.  Continue reading

No one like Him: The Singularity of God

The Westminster Shorter Catechism asks “Are there more Gods than one?”, then answers emphatically “There is but one only, the living and true God.”. Since my school just finished a week-long conference on this very theme, today’s post will revolve around the topic and will discuss the reasons for believing in the singularity of the Christian God. I hope to leave you with a clear understanding of the doctrine of monotheism in Christianity.

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