The Glory of Resurrection

On Friday I spoke of the death and burial of Christ. I went to a Good Friday service with my girlfriend that evening, and it was an excellent portrayal of the depth of Jesus’ agony on the cross as he took the sins of all humanity upon himself, all the while experiencing the wrath of God in punishment for sin. That day was the darkest in all of history, because God himself gave up his life in sacrifice for sinful man. God incarnate hung naked on a cross, beaten, bloody and bruised. He gasped for breath, fighting just to exhale. Professional executioners gathered around to mock him, gamble for his clothes and inflict as much pain as possible upon him, ultimately stabbing him with a spear and leaving him to die. He was taken down from the cross, that instrument of torture, and was laid in a tomb, never to walk the earth again — so thought his executioners. The good news is that they were wrong.

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The word preached

I woke up at 2 am today and couldn’t go back to sleep, so naturally I decided to take advantage of the time. Part of doing that was writing in my journal, and as I frequently do, I went and read some old stuff I’ve written.  Today I happened upon notes from a sermon I heard on October 5th, 2014, out of Matthew 26:69-27:10. Here’s what I wrote as a summary of the message:

“Be sorrowful over sins. It is appropriate to weep bitterly over them. Proceed then to an understanding of the glory of Christ’s majesty in his resurrection. We are saved through him, and we triumph in his blood!”

This spoke to me, and I hope it does to you as well. Be sorrowful for your sins, yes. More importantly, have a proper knowledge of Christ’s status and your standing before him.

Moral of the story: Preaching is powerful, and good notes allow good preaching to continue to be powerful long after the last word has faded from your ears.