Identity and passion

Has anyone ever told you to “follow your heart”, “be who you really are”, “do what feels right” or something like this? Such an imperative usually comes from a person who means well, and wants you to know it. I want to add a few drops of digital ink to the ocean which is the internet with the hope of showing why such statements are so hazardous to a correct perception of your identity as a Christian and to your passion for life.

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The Glory of Resurrection

On Friday I spoke of the death and burial of Christ. I went to a Good Friday service with my girlfriend that evening, and it was an excellent portrayal of the depth of Jesus’ agony on the cross as he took the sins of all humanity upon himself, all the while experiencing the wrath of God in punishment for sin. That day was the darkest in all of history, because God himself gave up his life in sacrifice for sinful man. God incarnate hung naked on a cross, beaten, bloody and bruised. He gasped for breath, fighting just to exhale. Professional executioners gathered around to mock him, gamble for his clothes and inflict as much pain as possible upon him, ultimately stabbing him with a spear and leaving him to die. He was taken down from the cross, that instrument of torture, and was laid in a tomb, never to walk the earth again — so thought his executioners. The good news is that they were wrong.

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The best Friday

What is good about Good Friday? After all, it is the day we mark the death of Jesus Christ, which took place as the result of the outpouring of God’s wrath against mankind, and this upon a sinless man!

Consider the weight upon Jesus’ shoulders, so much that he would cry out “My soul is deeply grieved, to the point of death!“, while at the Garden of Gethsemane, which refers to an oil press, where a heavy stone would crush olives, squeezing every drop out of them.

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Forgiven by God

For the last month I’ve been working through a series where I show how God’s actions toward Christians are the ultimate example of several of the most common human emotions. We are comforted by God, known by God, loved by God and forgiven by God. I have not explained this series very clearly, so allow me to do that.

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Loved by God

Please note: This is the third in a series of 4. If you haven’t read the first 2, read them here and here.

Love is one of the most overused and wrongly used words in the entire English language. You love your dog, french fries and your spouse. There’s clearly a difference, but it is critically important for us as Christians to make this difference explicit, especially in light of the great love with which God has loved us.  This post seeks to reclaim an element of the particularity of the word, and to show not only that God loves you, but also how and to what extent he loves you.

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Comforted by God

If you’re reading this, I’m assuming a couple of things about you. First, you are a human, and thus have feelings and emotions. Second, because of these feelings and emotions, you have been hurt at some point in your life, some of you deeply hurt by those who should have taken care of you. The third thing I assume about you is that you did not enjoy the process of being hurt. This part isn’t complicated. People hurt other people and the consequences are not fun. This is the result of sin in the world, and as long as there is still sin, there will be pain.

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Pointing toward Christ

I just returned from a weekend retreat with the youth group I work with. If you’ve ever gone to a youth retreat, you know that they’re usually loud, energetic and fun, but all too frequently, the theology presented is weak and shallow. This was fortunately not the case this weekend (not too badly, anyway).

It made me think about the purpose of such retreats though. Why do we take the time to bring young people a couple hundred miles from home, keep them up late, hype them up and even spend money on it? Continue reading

Atone-what?

What on earth is the atonement? Christians tend to talk about it in hushed tones, as if it is a divine mystery (spoiler: it is), while somehow failing to ever really talk about what they are referring to or what it actually is. Merriam Webster defines the word simply as “reparation for an offense or injury”, while giving satisfaction as a synonym. While this is certainly true, when we refer to the atonement as Christians, we refer to so much more. We speak of the atonement, referring to a particular historical event which has changed all of history. In doing this however, we incorporate the theological and historical significance of atonement as a cleansing from sins and the way to become right with God. Let me explain what I mean by this.

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